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Brigham City

Registered voters: 9,019
Cards cast: 2,144 (23.77%)
Mayor:
Tyler M. Vincent 89.04%
Paul Roberts 0.00% (Write-in votes: 10.96%)
City Council members:
Dennis DJ Bott 37.30%
Thomas Peterson 29.56%
Dean Lester 16.99%
Becky Maddox 15.66%

Perry City

Registered voters: 2,548
Cards cast: 982 (38.54%)
Mayor:
Karen Cronin 50.20%
David R. Daniels 49.29%
City Council members:
Esther Montgomery 28.30%
Brady Lewis 27.22%
Bruce E. Lyon 26.35%
Maurice Roche 17.80%

Willard City

Registered voters: 997
Cards cast: 390
Mayor:
Kenneth A. Braegger 76.55%
Joseph Curfew 21.91%
City Council members:
Robert Beebe 36.35%
Josh Braegger 34.79%
Toby A. Nishikawa 27.54%

 

 

Campaign season kicks off with ‘meet the candidates’ events

In a political campaign season kick-off of sorts, members of Brigham City Kiwanis Club hosted Brigham City’s candidates for elected office during the club’s weekly lunch at Maddox Ranch House in Perry.
Scott Nelson, a Kiwanis member, said this year he decided to hold the meet the candidates style event with his own desires to better know the city’s candidates in mind. Each candidate—in alphabetical order—was allotted a few moments to speak to the members of the club as a means of introduction.
Tyler Vincent and Paul Roberts, both candidates for mayor, were in attendance, as were city council candidates Dennis “DJ” Bott, Dean Lester, Becky Maddox and Tom Peterson. The candidates spoke on issues ranging from growth and development to alternative electric power sources to counter looming rate increases.
Upcoming events are planned in the community for voters to meet their candidates and, candidates hope, to avoid “dismal voter turnouts” as experienced during the primary election in August.
Brigham City Recorder Mary Kate Christensen described turn-out of only 7.6 percent of the city’s nearly 9,000 registered voters for the primary election as “very disappointing.” Christensen said it was the absolute lowest she could remember in more than 18 years with the city.
“Six hundred eighty four people made the decision who would go on to the general election,” said Christensen.
Brigham City’s Hervin Bunderson Center, 641 East 200 North, will host a meet the candidate event tonight, Sept. 25, at 6:30 p.m. Candidates will set up tables or booths in the auditorium to give voters the opportunity to speak with them during one-on-one conversations.
The Brigham City Area Chamber of Commerce has invited both Perry and Brigham City candidates to join chamber members at Iron Gate Grill in Brigham City on Oct. 10, for a meet the candidates breakfast. Invitations have been sent to members of the chamber, however, non-members should contact the chamber at 435-723-3931 for more information regarding attendance.
A candidates meeting sponsored by American Association of University Women, Brigham City Civic Improvement Club and Ladies Community Club will be held Oct. 16, to better acquaint the public with the candidates for Brigham City offices. The venue for that evening is the Brigham City Community Center, 24 North 300 West, beginning at 7 p.m.
Coordinated by Sarah Yates, who will also serve as moderator, the event will be a great opportunity for the general public to ask questions of the candidates.
“It is a time to decide who to vote for, or who not to vote for,” said Yates.
The event will begin with each candidate presenting their qualifications and visions for the city’s future. The moderated question and answer period will allow candidates to respond to written questions fielded by the audience.

 

Brigham City, Perry prepare for early voting

Brigham City and Perry will offer early voting for citizens in preparation for the primary election coming up on Tuesday, August 13. The primary election will eliminate several candidates so that only two candidates are running for each open seat for mayor or city council member in the non-partisan general election on Tuesday, November 5.
Early voting in both cities will begin Tuesday, July 30, and will run through Friday, August 9.
The general election is coming up Tuesday, November 5

Brigham City
The polls will be open for early voting July 30 - August 5 at Brigham City Hall, 20 North Main, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Photo identification will be required. The primary election will be held on August 13, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., at the USU Brigham City campus, 195 West 1100 South.
The general election will be Tuesday, November 5, at the same location.
There is no primary for the mayoral race with only one candidate, Tyler M. Vincent.
Voters will cast their ballot for two of the city council candidates. One of the five candidates will be eliminated from the ballot for the general election. The council candidates are Dean Lester, Thomas Peterson, Becky Maddox, Lee Johnson and Dennis J. (DJ) Bott.
Candidate profiles for Brigham City ran in the June 26 edition of the News Journal.

Perry
Perry’s polls will be open for early voting July 30 - August 5 at the city office, 3005 South 1200 West. Hours for early voting will be 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. every week day except Friday, August 2, when the hours will be 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
The primary election will be August 13, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Three Mile Creek Elementary School, 2625 South 1050 West, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Enter the southwest door and follow the voting signs to the mezzanine area.
Voters will cast their ballot for one mayoral candidate. The candidates are Karen Cronin, Stephen Francis, David R. Daniels.
Voters will cast their ballot for two city council candidates. The candidates are Bruce E. Lyon, Brady Lewis, Maurice Roche, Earl Pannebaker, Boyd F. Montgomery, Esther Montgomery, Toby K. Wright. The candidate Bill Price withdrew his name from the race.
See candidate profiles for Willard and Perry on page 3.

 

With some races packed, others absent candidates, Box Elder County could see interesting election year

With ballots set for this year’s municipal elections, two cities in the Bear River Valley find no candidate for mayor while other towns, such as Perry, will fight through primary elections this summer to get to Election Day this November.
When candidate filings closed in Bear River and Corinne on June 7, citizens of both towns realized that there was not a person among them who would step forward to lead them as mayor. With only one candidate for two city council seats in Corinne and two filings for as many seats on the Bear River city council, there may be no election at all, unless there are those who come out of the woodworks and declare their candidacy as write-ins on the ballot.
Mark Thomas, Director of Elections under Lt. Governor Greg Bell’s office, said sometimes there are those who do not want to go through the election process but might file their declarations as a write-in or look to be appointed should the seat go unfilled.
Write-ins have until September 6 to declare their candidacy. If there are still no write-ins by inauguration day, January 1, there would be an appointment process that any city in such a situation would have to initiate to fill the vacancy.
But Corinne’s current mayor, Richard Nimori, does not seem too worried about it going that far.
“We’re going to go out and aggressively try to generate interest in running for open offices,” said Nimori.
On the other hand, five candidates for city council in Brigham City woke on June 8 to find there would be a primary election on August 13 to thin the running.
Two men, Tyler Vincent and Reese Jensen, had placed their names in the hat for mayor of Brigham City but last week Jensen withdrew his name from the race citing “the embroilment encumbering city government.” Jensen said those issues would be better left to current elected officials and put his full support behind Vincent, leaving him as the sole unopposed candidate.
Meanwhile, in Perry, citizens there will find a primary election for both mayor and city council. For the office of mayor, three candidates are in the running while eight candidates are vying for two city council seats.
The incumbent mayor of Willard, Kenneth A. Braegger, has been challenged by former Willard chief of police, Joseph Curfew for a four year tour in the top seat of Willard City. With two seats on the city council open, incumbent city councilman, Robert Beebe, will fight to keep his chair while two newcomers each hope to take a seat at the table.
Ballots throughout the rest of Box Elder County in places such as Honeyville, Plymouth and even Elwood are indicative of a healthy election season.
Those cities requiring a primary election will hold them on August 13. Write-ins must announce their candidacy no later than September 6. This year, Election Day falls on Tuesday, November 5.
The Box Elder News Journal will run profiles of candidates for each city in the coming weeks. This edition contains candidate profiles of those seeking public office in Brigham City and Perry. Watch future editions for candidate profiles from Willard, Bear River, Corinne and more.

 

Brigham City

Mayoral candidates


Tyler M. Vincent
Age: 51
Occupation: Owner of Burt’s Auto Body & Glass, Inc.
Family: Married, three children
Hobbies: Spending time with family, outdoors, camping, fishing, classic cars, Sunday school class

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
I am the owner of a successful third generation family business and understand how to run it successfully. I have lived in Brigham City all of my life and I love our community and the great people who live here. I have been the mayor pro tem for two years and have been involved in city business for four years.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
City government can’t do everything but we are required to do certain things such as offer clean water, beautiful parks and other city services, administering them efficiently. We need to know the issues and how they affect our city.
What is the most important issue your city is facing?
Economic growth. With the loss of jobs in our community and county, we need to foster more business growth at all job levels.

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
Energy. We need to look for alternative energy. Growth. We need to have a plan for the growth of our city.


Brigham City

City council candidates

Dennis J. (DJ) Bott
Age: 43
Occupation: Self-employed, Bott Monument
Family: Married, two children
Hobbies: Camping, 4-wheeling, spending time with family and friends

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
Running a small family business, I understand what it means to make a paycheck just above the poverty line and still lead a fun, fulfilling life with little debt. I love Brigham City and I know its history. In fact, my family has been a big part of that history. Perhaps my most telling qualifications are that I am happy, I have a positive attitude which makes me approachable and I am willing to listen and not afraid to act. I don’t have any agenda or axes to grind, I’m not looking to advance my business, my family or its legacy; I just want to serve.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
I am conservative and as such I am terrified of debt. But sometimes you have to spend money to make money. The government will not save us. I believe in work. Stop whining, get up, rub some dirt on it and get to work. My motto: “Don’t tell me, show me.”

What is the most important issue your city is facing?
Besides mistrust, complacency, contempt and low morale? Jobs are our number one priority. Our attitude of entitlement is a hindrance and we also face issues based on prior bad decisions regarding ordinances, commitments and individuals.

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
Infrastructure, top heavy/big government bureaucracy, electricity and power and education.


Lee Johnson
Age: 44
Occupation: Production associate at Autoliv
Family: Two children
Hobbies: German long-sword, volunteer work, architectural and historical research, hiking, bird watching, singing and Tai Chi

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
Some of the issues that citizens face today relate to digital technology, having grown up with computers, with 10 years experience in the technology field, my perspective and experience in technology will be a great asset to the community. As a former business owner and operator, I have had experience with contracts, government regulations and financial reports. I enjoy exploring topics, researching issues and seeking out perspectives or opinions that may not be obvious or popular, so that discussions and decisions can be made with openness and wisdom.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
Government needs to get out of playing the game, including being a service provider, a real estate developer, an amusement coordinator, etc. Preserving the rights of every individual is very important to me. Government at all levels must remain small and limited. It is much easier to watch after a small organization, to teach them and remind everyone to pay attention to the citizens they are entrusted to serve.
What is the most important issue your city is facing?
Brigham City government has far outgrown its initial role as provider of necessities for the early settlers in this area. Most adults are fully capable of providing for their own needs and wants, however, Brigham City maintains a monopoly on most of the municipal utilities and services within the city. I believe the solution will have to come from a return to sound principles of government and by shedding the luxuries and frivolous things that years of progressive policies and other false ideologies have accumulated in material possessions as well as a loss of values. We will need to free our own hands before we can honestly offer to carry the burdens of others.

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
Our culture today is overwhelmed with materialism and it comes at the expense of our rights. Brigham City is losing large amounts of money in a futile attempt to “keep up with the Joneses.” The swimming pool, museum, Utopia, etc., all have their own price that must be paid. Eventually the price will be too high. Sometimes I wonder if the residents of our country and city are awake enough to recognize evil, strong enough to stand against it and understand the consequences for not being actively involved.

Dean Lester
Age: 59
Occupation: Scientist / Engineer
Family: Married, three children, six grandchildren.
Hobbies: Bird watching, camping, hiking, fishing, dutch oven cooking and singing around the campfire

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
I love Brigham City. I moved to Brigham in 1958 when my father went to work at the new rocket factory. I was five years old. Except for a few short forays away during my teens and early twenties, here I stayed. Following in my father’s footsteps, since 1980 I, too, am employed at the rocket factory as a scientist/engineer. My career experience has prepared me to be a successful city council member. Project management requires me to build teams of people working effectively together. Communication and cooperation skills are a big part of my job. I also work with large budgets and must stay within cost and on schedule. I believe in the value of community service. I served for nine years on the Brigham City library board. I currently volunteer occasionally at the Bird Refuge and on a Boy Scout troop committee. It is now time for me to serve on the city council.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
As a city council member I will work hard to maintain and nurture anything that helps our town remain an enjoyable and safe place to live. I have no political experience and no ax to grind. I will use common sense and kindness as my guiding philosophy. I will try to be reasonable and always civil.

What is the most important issue your city is facing?
I feel at this time maintaining Brigham as a great little town by respecting diversity and bringing civility back into politics is our most important issue.

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
Water: We live in a desert and Brigham City’s water is a very important asset. As growth continues on the Wasatch Front there will be continuing pressure to tap into this resource.
Energy: As the cost of energy continues to climb building a community with access to services through bicycling and walking will become essential.
Jobs: People need jobs with a living wage. Careful consideration should be made when recruiting new businesses to our community.
Redevelopment: Developing Utah State University Brigham City Campus as an integral part of the community will be very important to the enhancement of our quality of life. Development of our city center should be scaled to sustainable growth. The Bird Refuge brings thousands of people to Brigham each year. If our downtown is an inviting, charming place to visit, eat and shop we could draw more tourist business.

Becky Maddox
Age: 66
Occupation: Physical Therapist Assistant
Family: Single
Hobbies: Reading, sports activities and political studies from the perspective of our Founding Fathers

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
I have a college education, earning a Bachelor of Science in physical education with an area of emphasis in outdoor education and environmental interpretation from Oregon State University. In Las Vegas, Nevada, I served 13 years on the Board of Directors of Nevada Concerned Citizens (NCC), which passed the Protection of Marriage Amendment to the Nevada Constitution. The NCC is where I learned to recognize the games many politicians play, read and interpret legislative bills to see if they’re constitutional. I will work to apply correct principles to stop government from regulating our freedoms and liberties away. I will work with others to restore our liberties and freedoms.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
Principles of right and wrong don’t change—they are eternal principles that should always be upheld. The Oath of Office for appointed or elected officials says, in part: “…I will support, obey, and defend the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of this State…” I will honor that oath and work to make wise and just principles popular. Our government gets its power and authority from the people. Since I don’t have the right to force my neighbors to be charitable or to give me their money or property to make us equal, government doesn’t have that power either, since no one can delegate a right they don’t have. I believe government’s job is to see that constitutional laws are applied equally to all our citizens. Our Constitution doesn’t give government the right to provide for our recreation or entertainment. We are to vote with our feet and our dollars for what we, individually, want.

What is the most important issue your city is facing?
Unconstitutional confiscation of taxpayer money and property—not only by the city, but allowing the county, state, and national government to do the same.

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
If we don’t reverse direction and stop illegally taking money and property from the people and protect them from others who do the same thing, now, we will lose our freedoms and liberties and become a third world nation. It may seem an extreme position, but it’s the truth.

Thomas Peterson
Age: 35
Occupation: Chief Building Official for Box Elder County/President of Peterson Electric.
Family: Married, four children
Hobbies: Golfing, camping, riding ATV’s and spending time with family.

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
I believe that I am a good candidate for city council because I have the ability to make well educated decisions. I was employed by the city for seven years as a building inspector and feel that I have a pretty good understanding of how the city works. In that time, I developed working relationships with those I served. As an employee of the city I always felt that I was a public servant and it was my job to serve those I worked for, as an elected official I will do the same. I believe that each of us that live in a community need to do our part to make sure it moves in a direction that will facilitate the future while being fiscally responsible to the citizens we serve in the present.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
I believe in conservative principles and in fiscal responsibility. I feel that when it comes to running a balanced budget it is the only option and commend previous councils and mayors that have done just that. With that being said, I feel that we need to make sure that we are looking to the future, that we are doing our best to predict future needs. I feel an overwhelming sense of responsibility to make sure the taxes that are assessed on our citizens are used to their fullest. I believe in limited government to a degree, but have thoroughly enjoyed the use of the city owned facilities and the recreation programs and believe that they are needed to make our community great.

What is the most important issue your city is facing?
I am a small business owner in the city and feel that we need to work to grow such businesses. Brigham City has a great staff and I look forward to gathering their input as to what they feel our future needs may be. I am a large proponent of economic development and look forward to exploring avenues that may help us expand our businesses in this great community.

 

Perry Mayoral candidates

Karen Cronin
Age: 47
Occupation: Full-time mom and financial director of AIM PT
Family: Married, four children
Hobbies: Camping, hiking, traveling, gardening, reading and playing tennis

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
I have served as a Perry City Council Member for the past four years, Point Perry RDA board member, Planning Commissioner for three years on the Perry City Planning Commission, Box Elder School District board member, Chairman of the Box Elder School District STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math) Education Committee, Committee member of the Box Elder Economic Development Alliance, Boys & Girls Club of Northern Utah Executive Board member, Financial Director of privately held company (Ability in Motion Physical Therapy), past project manager at Thiokol over master scheduling and contract compliance. I am both a citizen and a taxpayer of Perry City.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
I have a strong belief in limited government and I am a proponent of transparency in government at all levels. As a fiscal conservative, I am determined to work to utilize the public resources in the most efficient manner. I am guided by the belief that government officials are responsible to represent the voice of the people, not personal agendas.

What is the most important issue your city is facing?
Economic development is vital to help provide employment to members of our community so they can meet the financial needs of their individual families and also to increase the tax base within the city and thus reduce the tax burden for home/land owners and our citizens.

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
As the Wasatch Front population continues to expand north from Weber County, Perry City will see a large surge of new residential and commercial developments. This growth will need to be prudently planned for and carefully managed to ensure infrastructure, utilities, technical, and emergency services are generated in a financially responsible manner and meet the needs of a diverse population.

David R. Daniels
Age: 64
Occupation: Retired Logistics Engineer
Family: Married, 10 children
Hobbies: Music, coach competitive baseball, farming

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
First of all, I care about the City of Perry and its citizens. I feel that my experience during my career has prepared me to serve the city as mayor. As a project manager I ran a program with a budget of $13.2 million. I finished that program on time and under budget. I have the ability to organize and prioritize projects and issues. I am able to identify and perform tasks in the most economical and efficient manner. I have the ability to analyze and synthesize issues and concerns to achieve the best outcome.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
I believe in using “common sense” as a basic premise to making sound decisions. I feel that we need to do what is right for the right reason based upon thorough study and analysis.

What is the most important issue your city is facing?
Making sure all funds are used wisely and appropriately.

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
With cities around the country going bankrupt, the wise use of funds in our generation will establish a sound foundation for future generations.

Stephen Francis
Age: 37
Occupation: Probation Officer
Family: Married, three children
Hobbies: Peach farming

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
I was born and raised in Perry and have spent the majority of my life here. My skills include good communication, negotiation, the ability to handle complex situations, and knowing how to evaluate a situation to make quick, effective decisions. With my profession, I have learned to look at all options and make tough decisions quickly and effectively. I am willing to make thoughtful decisions that are not always the most popular option but are in the best interest of all those involved.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
I believe that if elected as mayor, my duty is to listen to the citizens of Perry City and represent the interests of the majority. In my profession, I have seen firsthand that you cannot make everyone happy and feelings can get hurt. If elected, I will strive to listen to all sides of the issues and work with the members of the city council to do what is best for the city.

What is the most important issue your city is facing?
It is important that we increase the safety of Highway 89 by working with UDOT and implementing better traffic control devices. I believe we need to continue to improve Perry’s roads and walking trails. I also want to continue developing our parks and open spaces.

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
One problem Perry’s next generation will battle is managed growth. I feel that our town has grown too rapidly in the past, leaving our roads and infrastructure outdated. We need to continue to fix those problems and not repeat past mistakes. We need to continue to develop commercial areas, improve our residential areas with lighting and sidewalks, and make sure developers follow through with all requirements before those developments are occupied.

Perry City council candidates


Bill Price
Age: 68
Occupation: Retired
Family: Married, five children, 14 grandchildren
Hobbies: Traveling, collecting books

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
I have worked for 26 years with people in economic and human resource development and I believe that experience will help Perry City. I owned my own business for 10 years which I started in my garage and expanded to a 14 employee operation in south Box Elder County. I have a bachelor’s degree in finance and a master’s degree in human resource management.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
I do not believe in a lot of meaningless laws within the city, I would like the city to enjoy a smooth and open atmosphere and not end up with laws that are unnecessary.

What is the most important issue your city is facing?
I know that government laws can dampen the efforts of a small business and discourage them instead of help them. With my experience, I believe I can bring new businesses to Perry City and not discourage them. I know that all businesses can’t start out in a large way and we need to encourage them by doing whatever we can by lowering the taxes and fees that we charge them.

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
I have a great appreciation for the sporting programs for the youth in city, I know that the youth need to develop their skills and have a great need to have this opportunity.

Boyd F. Montgomery
Age: 72
Occupation: Retired
Family: Married, five children, two “handfuls of grandchildren”
Hobbies: Grandchildren, coins, electronics, guns, movies, gemstones

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
I have been a resident of Perry since December of 1999 and in that time have assisted with several of the parades and Fourth of July activities, served on the Perry City Board of Adjustments. Currently a member of the Box Elder County Board of Adjustments. I have had extensive dealings with the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (and won so far). I have exceeded a basic high school education with a degree in electronics. I have been employed from as little as a bus boy to as high as a senior electronics technician for the federal government. I was the cellular technician on the team that first put the Sprint cellular telephone system in Northern Utah, and I maintained that system for about 2 years. I was a member of Lions International for over 24 years and became involved in many community activities all over the country. I have lived in and traveled many states. I have traveled much of the world and stayed long enough to learn much about many of the countries that I worked in and visited. Most of all I have a genuine need to help the community in which I live and to help see to it that things that should not happen, don’t, and things that need to happen, get done in a timely fashion. I am also very active in my church and have been helpful to other churches in our communities. I was an active member of the Brigham City Area Chamber of Commerce up to the time I terminated a small business this past year. Most important to me is I am more than willing to put in the time needed to help see that Perry City stays a good place to live. I am also more than willing to listen to all of the people that live and work here.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
I endorse no specific political party but rather vote for the person and policy that best helps the general population. I have as of the past few years been very concerned about the way the senior population and their needs and rights seem to be ignored. Unjust or unnecessary taxes and charges are also high on my list. As a council member we must be aware of all needs, problems and desires of our community. We must also be willing and able to listen to our community.

What is the most important issue your city is facing?
Expansion, growth, development of commerce, completion of needed and assigned projects

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
Growth and its needs.

Brady Lewis
Age: 31
Occupation: Owner, Allmoxy Software and Lewis Cabinet Specialties
Family: Married, three children
Hobbies: Gardening, fly fishing, skiing and snowboarding

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
I have a passion for solving problems, I like difficult issues. I know how to build efficient systems. In business that means profit, in government it means lower taxes and better services. I know how to leverage opposing viewpoints to find mutually advantageous solutions. I love brainstorming and collaboration. I worked on the 2012 presidential campaign for Mitt Romney. I connected with amazing people and learned a great deal about political systems in America. I own two businesses, so I know how to budget, innovate, scrape, reason, and lead. I am young enough to implement technology, yet mature enough to make wise decisions. I like to meet new people and love good conversation.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
“In God we trust.” I am a man of faith and believe that the strength of our nation directly correlates with our moral code, which is strongest when we look to God for inspiration. I tend to be a fiscal conservative, social moderate, Libertarian leaning Republican.

What is the most important issue your city is facing?
Right now, Perry has several transportation issues on the table, namely working with UTA to bring a FrontRunner station to Perry. A “Continuous Flow Intersection” at 1100 South and 1200 West.
Joint funding with UDOT for a Diverging Diamond Intersection at the freeway entrance as well as the annexation of the port of entry.

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
The rising costs of government have to be mitigated, or our children could be burdened. Perry is not in trouble, but we need to keep it that way. We can sure up our future if we swiftly implement creative solutions, technology, and question every expense. If we can set the tone for the future, our children will benefit from our responsibility. I am optimistic about this community, love it, and look forward to helping it reach its full potential.

Esther Montgomery
Age: 34
Occupation: Instructional Aide at Promontory, non-profit aerobics instructor, Perry City Planning Commissioner
Family: Married, four children
Hobbies: Music, dance, reading, proof reading, writing, camping, hiking, landscaping, gardening and volunteering

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
Being a mother requires a fair amount of strategic planning, but to fully appreciate my qualification, you have to go back a few years, to the time that I served in the United States Army Reserves. I enlisted when I was 17 to put myself through college, but by the time I was 24 I had already earned the rank of Staff Sergeant and held many leadership positions. I served through a deployment, during Operation - Iraqi Freedom, in 2003. There, I demonstrated resilience, perseverance, and leadership in every arena I encountered. Thereafter, I took a few quiet, yet lively, years to raise my young family. It was two years ago, that I first felt moved upon to get involved, politically. Now, I have viable experience, working in Perry City, as I have served on the Perry City Planning Commission for the last two years. I am familiar with our municipal codes and have attended many city council meetings. I have demonstrated good judgment and decisiveness, and I am ready to engage in the discussions that pertain to this city. I’ve also been privileged to serve on the school board at Promontory School of Expeditionary Learning. I only just resigned that position, in order to pursue this opportunity, but that experience has been very valuable, as well—working with a board and on different sub-committees, researching and collecting data, corresponding with outside sources and forming partnerships and agreements. That is my experience and that is what I know I can bring to Perry City Council.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
I have a “can do” philosophy that has always served me well. If there is a way, I’ll find it. I am a researcher, a hard worker, detail oriented, and very open to new ideas. However, I won’t make important decisions until I have all of the facts, and can be right with myself about them. The role of city government is not to restrict, but to provide the necessary infrastructure, in order to empower its citizens.

What is the most important issue your city is facing?
Two telecommunication towers have been approved to be built on city-owned land. Communications with UTA and UDOT are ongoing, over two extensive projects: the FrontRunner commuter train and a diverging diamond interchange, designed to expedite the traffic on and off I-15. Also, encouraging businesses to take a chance in Perry is worth our attention. All of these will surely have an impact on our fair city.

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
So many laws are being passed these days, but with every ordinance - as we are being told what and how and where and why we can do this or that - our agency is being restricted. That is something we should all be wary of - now, and generations from now.

Toby Wright
Age: 34
Occupation: MRI technologist
Family: Married
Hobbies: Winter sports

What are some of your qualifications that make you the best choice to represent your city?
I am excited and ready for a new challenge. For years, my grandfather has served on the Ogden City Council and he has inspired me to do the same and give back to the community. I look forward to serving and making a difference.

What political ideals and philosophies guide your decision making?
I will use a common sense approach and as many resources as possible to help make Perry a better place to raise a family and be successful.

What is the most important issue your city is facing?
Children’s education, which we as a people seem to be losing control of, thriving businesses, and the needs of the people of Perry.

What are some of the major issues your city will face a generation from now?
A generation from now I think we will have a challenge of youth not understanding their responsibility. We also face economic growth challenges and clean natural resources.

Other candidates
Perry City Council candidates Bruce Lyon, Maurice Roche and Earl Pannebaker did not respond to News Journal requests for information.


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